The Progressive Era in the USA: 1890–1921

Publisher : Routledge
Release Date :
ISBN : 1351883488
Pages : 478 pages
Rating Book: 4.5/5 (351 users)

Download or read book The Progressive Era in the USA: 1890–1921 written by Kristofer Allerfeldt and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2017-05-15 with total page 478 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Few periods in American history have been explored as much as the Progressive Era. It is seen as the birth-place of modern American liberalism, as well as the time in which America emerged as an imperial power. Historians and other scholars have struggled to explain the contradictions of this period and this volume explores some of the major controversies this exciting period has inspired. Investigating subjects as diverse as conservation, socialism, or the importance of women in the reform movements, this volume looks at the lasting impact of this productive, yet ultimately frustrated, generation's legacy on American and world history.

Organized Crime in the United States, 1865–1941

Publisher : McFarland
Release Date :
ISBN : 147662996X
Pages : 300 pages
Rating Book: 4.7/5 (476 users)

Download or read book Organized Crime in the United States, 1865–1941 written by Kristofer Allerfeldt and published by McFarland. This book was released on 2018-01-19 with total page 300 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Why do Americans alternately celebrate and condemn gangsters, outlaws and corrupt politicians? Why do they immortalize Al Capone while forgetting his more successful contemporaries George Remus or Roy Olmstead? Why are some public figures repudiated for their connections to the mob while others gain celebrity status? Drawing on historical accounts, the author analyzes the public’s understanding of organized crime and questions some of our most deeply held assumptions about crime and its role in society.

Race, Radicalism, Religion, and Restriction

Publisher : Greenwood Publishing Group
Release Date :
ISBN : 0275978540
Pages : 235 pages
Rating Book: 4.7/5 (275 users)

Download or read book Race, Radicalism, Religion, and Restriction written by Kristofer Allerfeldt and published by Greenwood Publishing Group. This book was released on 2003-03-30 with total page 235 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In 1924 America passed legislation that effectively outlined which immigrants were to be considered beneficial to the national body and which were not. Albert Johnson, a Washington State Congressman, sponsored the Act. This study examines the role of the Pacific Northwest in the change of national sentiment that led up to this legislation. Analyzing issues of race, religion, and political radicalism, Allerfeldt determines that the region was highly influential in the national debate.

Crime and the Rise of Modern America

Publisher : Routledge
Release Date :
ISBN : 1136821538
Pages : 264 pages
Rating Book: 4.3/5 (136 users)

Download or read book Crime and the Rise of Modern America written by Kristofer Allerfeldt and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2011-04-27 with total page 264 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In Crime and the Rise of Modern America, Kristofer Allerfeldt studies the crimes, criminals, and law enforcement that have contributed to a uniquely American system of crime and punishment from the end of the Civil War to the eve of World War II to understand how the rapidly-changing technology of transportation, media, and incarceration have affected the criminal underworld. In ten thematic chapters, Crime and the Rise of Modern America turns to the outlaws of the iconic West and the illegal distilleries of Prohibition, the turn-of-the-century immigrants, and the conmen who preyed on the people of the Promised Land, to examine how crime and America both changed, defining each other.

Cultural Studies

Publisher : Intellect Books
Release Date :
ISBN : 184150498X
Pages : 450 pages
Rating Book: 4.4/5 (841 users)

Download or read book Cultural Studies written by Intellect Books and published by Intellect Books. This book was released on 2013 with total page 450 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This volume of Who's Who in Research series offers a useful guide for current researchers in Intellect's subject area of Cultural Studies.

The Species Maker

Publisher : University of Alabama Press
Release Date :
ISBN : 0817360158
Pages : 392 pages
Rating Book: 4.1/5 (817 users)

Download or read book The Species Maker written by Kristin Johnson and published by University of Alabama Press. This book was released on 2021 with total page 392 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: When William Jennings Bryan began his campaign to get evolution out of American schools in the 1920s, entomologist Martin Sullivan sought refuge in science, trusting the methods of careful observation and testing to the passion of public debate. But Martin will not be able to retreat to his museum specimens for long. Suddenly uprooted from his work at Harvard's Museum of Comparative Zoology and teaching college biology in the Pacific Northwest instead, Martin finds his students, colleagues, and local residents looking to him to help them understand the day's heated debates about science, politics, and religion. As anti-evolution laws spread around the country, freethinkers are using evolution to justify socialism and free love, politicians cite Darwin in their racist arguments against immigration, and some biologists are campaigning to improve American society through eugenics. In his quest to make sense of it all, Martin befriends a minister and fellow naturalist who helps him understand the challenges of reconciling evolution with Christianity, falls in love with a woman whose life has been curtailed by eugenicist theories, and gets mixed up with radical socialists' efforts to change the world. By the time the state of Tennessee puts John T. Scopes on trial for teaching evolution in the summer of 1925, Martin must face with the enormous pressures biological discoveries have placed on so many aspects of everyday life. Ultimately, Martin must overcome his reticence, come to terms with his own convictions, and take a stand in the fights over the role of science in American society. Although set nearly a hundred years ago, The Species Maker wrestles with many issues that continue to confront scientists and science-watchers in the present day. In the wake of the Great War, values were shifting; competing visions of the future of American culture and society reached into every aspect of life. Scientists, like so many others, struggled with how to frame their role in that future. By reflecting on this earlier period--its Red Scare, its Immigration Laws, its scientific racism, eugenics movement, attitudes toward women, debates over Fundamentalism and Modernism, and the role of scientists in American life--readers are given points of comparison to explore questions of science and values, the role of scientists in activism, and the relationships between science and religion. In its portrayal of individuals from fundamentally different attitudes, perspectives, values, and beliefs wrestling with each other's ways, and sometimes trying to understand those perspectives, The Species Maker hopes to inspire readers to think about what so often seems to prevent such conversations, how and why civil discourse should be valued, and how it might be "done." Meanwhile, the story of Martin and his friends reflects how these seemingly abstract debates can play critical roles in the lives of individuals, both in the 1920s and today.

Who's Who in Research: Cultural Studies

Publisher : Intellect Books
Release Date :
ISBN : 1783201614
Pages : 434 pages
Rating Book: 4.8/5 (783 users)

Download or read book Who's Who in Research: Cultural Studies written by Intellect Books and published by Intellect Books. This book was released on 2013-01-01 with total page 434 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Increasingly, academic communities transcend national boundaries. 'Collaboration between researchers across space is clearly increasing, as well as being increasingly sought after,' noted the online magazine Inside Higher Ed in a recent article about research in the social sciences and humanities. Even for those scholars who don’t work directly with international colleagues, staying up-to-date and relevant requires keeping up with international currents of thought in one’s field. But when one’s colleagues span the globe, it’s not always easy to keep track of who’s who – or what kind of research they’re conducting. That’s where Intellect’s new series comes in. A set of worldwide guides to leading academics – and their work – across the arts and humanities, Who’s Who in Research features comprehensive profiles of scholars in the areas of cultural studies, film studies, media studies, performing arts and visual arts. Who's Who in Research: Visual Arts includes concise yet detailed listings include each academic’s name, institution, biography, and current research interests, as well as bibliographic information and a list of articles published in Intellect journals. The volumes in the Who’s Who in Research series will be updated each year, providing the most current information on the foremost thinkers in academia and making them an invaluable resource for scholars, hiring committees, academic libraries and would-be collaborators across the arts and humanities.

Day of Empire

Publisher : Anchor
Release Date :
ISBN : 0307472450
Pages : 432 pages
Rating Book: 4.0/5 (37 users)

Download or read book Day of Empire written by Amy Chua and published by Anchor. This book was released on 2009-01-06 with total page 432 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In this sweeping history, bestselling author Amy Chua explains how globally dominant empires—or hyperpowers—rise and why they fall. In a series of brilliant chapter-length studies, she examines the most powerful cultures in history—from the ancient empires of Persia and China to the recent global empires of England and the United States—and reveals the reasons behind their success, as well as the roots of their ultimate demise. Chua's analysis uncovers a fascinating historical pattern: while policies of tolerance and assimilation toward conquered peoples are essential for an empire to succeed, the multicultural society that results introduces new tensions and instabilities, threatening to pull the empire apart from within. What this means for the United States' uncertain future is the subject of Chua's provocative and surprising conclusion.

Asian American History Day by Day: A Reference Guide to Events

Publisher : ABC-CLIO
Release Date :
ISBN : 031339928X
Pages : 463 pages
Rating Book: 4.1/5 (313 users)

Download or read book Asian American History Day by Day: A Reference Guide to Events written by Jonathan H. X. Lee and published by ABC-CLIO. This book was released on 2018-10-12 with total page 463 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: An accessible and ready reference for student research, this day-by-day guide highlights the importance of Asian Americans in U.S. history, highlighting the impact of specific individuals and this large ethnic group as a whole across time and documenting the evolution of policies, issues, and feelings concerning this particular American population. • Provides detailed information throughout history on the events, people, and places of Asian American history • Presents a unique calendar approach to recognizing the contributions of this significant ethnic demographic throughout U.S. history that demonstrates how all 365 days of the year can feature an achievement made by Asian Americans • Offers information on celebrities, inventors, events, and more that relate to Asian American life in the United States

Pacific Connections

Publisher : Univ of California Press
Release Date :
ISBN : 0520271696
Pages : 271 pages
Rating Book: 4.2/5 (52 users)

Download or read book Pacific Connections written by Kornel Chang and published by Univ of California Press. This book was released on 2012-06-12 with total page 271 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: “Pacific Connections is a shrewd, fascinating, and cogent examination of a Pacific Northwest borderland often taken for granted as a peaceful but inconsequential meeting point between two friendly nations. Chang shows instead how it has been a violent point of contention, shaped by empire and Anglo-American aspirations to hegemony, migration and ubiquitous racism, the creation of boundaries through state formation, and the transgression of those boundaries by the mechanisms of capital. Sharply written and deeply researched, this book brings the Pacific Northwest into both the history of the Pacific World and the literature on borderlands that has until now focused largely on the U.S. and Mexico. Pacific Connections is a brilliant achievement.”—Bruce Cumings, author of Dominion From Sea to Sea: Pacific Ascendancy and American Power. "This wonderful book combines impressive archival research with a strong grounding in migration studies, political economy, cultural studies, and critical race studies. Chang examines weighty questions through compelling human dramas set in far-flung places across the Pacific Rim. This is transnational history at its best."—David Roediger, coauthor of The Production of Difference. "Kornel Chang grapples with big ideas and big questions. Tracing the global movements behind racial and national borders and unraveling the messy contradictions of empire at the dawn of the twentieth century, Pacific Connections explores a history that continues to haunt us, with particular resonance in our current moment."—Moon-Ho Jung, author of Coolies and Cane: Race, Labor, and Sugar in the Age of Emancipation. “Pacific Connections is a capacious study that recasts the U.S.-Canadian borderlands as a crucial site of migration, trade, and exclusion within the formation of Pacific empire. Chang shows how Chinese merchants, Japanese and European migrants, indigenous traders, Anglo labor activists, and both South Asian and white radicals played important roles in the negotiations of sovereignty.”—Lisa Lowe, Professor of Comparative Literature, University of California, San Diego.

The Ku Klux Klan and Freemasonry in 1920s America

Publisher : Routledge
Release Date :
ISBN : 0429883625
Pages : 212 pages
Rating Book: 4.2/5 (429 users)

Download or read book The Ku Klux Klan and Freemasonry in 1920s America written by Miguel Hernandez and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2019-02-06 with total page 212 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The Second Ku Klux Klan’s success in the 1920s remains one of the order’s most enduring mysteries. Emerging first as a brotherhood dedicated to paying tribute to the original Southern organization of the Reconstruction period, the Second Invisible Empire developed into a mass movement with millions of members that influenced politics and culture throughout the early 1920s. This study explores the nature of fraternities, especially the overlap between the Klan and Freemasonry. Drawing on many previously untouched archival resources, it presents a detailed and nuanced analysis of the development and later decline of the Klan and the complex nature of its relationship with the traditions of American fraternalism.

Circuits in the Sea

Publisher : Greenwood Publishing Group
Release Date :
ISBN : 9780275982317
Pages : 308 pages
Rating Book: 4.8/5 (982 users)

Download or read book Circuits in the Sea written by Chester G. Hearn and published by Greenwood Publishing Group. This book was released on 2004 with total page 308 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: It perfected transoceanic communications and connected the world with circuits in the sea."--Jacket.

Contesting Nordicness

Publisher : Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
Release Date :
ISBN : 3110730103
Pages : 258 pages
Rating Book: 4.1/5 (11 users)

Download or read book Contesting Nordicness written by Jani Marjanen and published by Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG. This book was released on 2021-12-20 with total page 258 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The terms ‘Nordic’ and ‘Scandinavian’ are widely used to refer to the politics, society and culture of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. But why have people felt the need to frame things as Nordic and why has the adjective Nordic become so prominent? This book adopts a rhetorical approach, analysing the speech acts which have shaped the meanings of the term. What do the different terms Nordic and Scandinavian have in common, and how have the uses of these terms changed in different historical periods? What accounts for the apparent upsurge in uses of the rhetoric of Nordicness in the 2010s? Drawing on eight case studies of the uses of Nordic and Scandinavian from the nineteenth century to the present day, the book explores the appeal and the flexibility of the rhetoric of Nordicness, in relation to race, openness, gender equality, food, crime fiction, Nordic co-operation and the Nordic model. Arguing that ‘Nordic’ and ‘Scandinavian’ are flexible and contested concepts that have been used in different, often contradictory and inherently political ways, the book suggests that the usage of the term has evolved from a means of creating a cultural community, to forging political co-operation and further to marketing models in politics and popular culture. The rhetorical approach also shows how many of the hallmarks of Nordic political culture, such as the Nordic model, Nordic gender equality or Nordic openness are more recent conceptualisations than usually assumed. As such, the book argues for the need to turn attention away from analysing the different components of Nordicness into studying how, when, and for what purpose different features were made Nordic.

From All Points

Publisher : Indiana University Press
Release Date :
ISBN : 0253027969
Pages : 649 pages
Rating Book: 4.5/5 (253 users)

Download or read book From All Points written by Elliott Robert Barkan and published by Indiana University Press. This book was released on 2007-05-11 with total page 649 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: A history of immigrants in the American West in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and their effect on the region. At a time when immigration policy is the subject of heated debate, this book makes clear that the true wealth of America is in the diversity of its peoples. By the end of the twentieth century, the American West was home to nearly half of America’s immigrant population, including Asians and Armenians, Germans and Greeks, Mexicans, Italians, Swedes, Basques, and others. This book tells their rich and complex story—of adaptation and isolation, maintaining and mixing traditions, and an ongoing ebb and flow of movement, assimilation, and replenishment. These immigrants and their children built communities, added to the region’s culture, and contended with discrimination and the lure of Americanization. The mark of the outsider, the alien, the nonwhite passed from group to group, even as the complexion of the region changed. The region welcomed, then excluded, immigrants, in restless waves of need and nativism that continue to this day. “Written in the fashion of Oscar Handlin, this study makes a convincing case that immigration history comprises an essential part of the history of the American West, and that appreciation of the former and the roles played by myriad alien arrivals is essential for understanding the latter. . . . Barkan . . . combines vignettes based on immigrant reminiscences with keen analysis to explore four related themes: various groups’ arrivals, their economic influences, their effects on public policy, and their adaptation and assimilation. The resulting narrative is readable and informative. . . . Recommended.” —Choice “A remarkable synthesis of the West as a region of immigrants. It tells the story of how vital immigrants were to economic growth and modernization. This will be the prime reference for 21st century scholars of immigration and ethnicity in the American West.” —Annals of Wyoming, Spring 2010

Rethinking Military History

Publisher : Routledge
Release Date :
ISBN : 1134477015
Pages : 272 pages
Rating Book: 4.3/5 (134 users)

Download or read book Rethinking Military History written by Jeremy Black and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2014-12-10 with total page 272 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Rethinking Military History is a bold new 'thought book' that reconsiders military history at the beginning of the twenty-first century. The chapters provide a valuable and concise survey of the main themes in the study of military history from 1500 to the present day as Jeremy Black reveals the main trends in the practice and approach to military history and proposes a new manifesto for the subject to move forward. This must-read study demonstrates the limitations of current approaches, including common generalizations, omissions, and over-simplications. Engaging theoretical discussions, with reference to specific conflicts, suggest how these limitations can be remedied and adapted, whilst incorporating contributions from other disciplines. Rethinking Military History is essential reading for all those with an interest in military history, and all who wish to take part in moving the discipline forward.

Exporting Freedom

Publisher : Harvard University Press
Release Date :
ISBN : 0674915844
Pages : 253 pages
Rating Book: 4.7/5 (674 users)

Download or read book Exporting Freedom written by Anna Su and published by Harvard University Press. This book was released on 2016-01-04 with total page 253 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Religious freedom is recognized as a basic human right, guaranteed by nearly all national constitutions. Anna Su charts the rise of religious freedom as an ideal firmly enshrined in international law and shows how America’s promotion of the cause of individuals worldwide to freely practice their faith advanced its ascent as a global power.

Corruption in America

Publisher : Harvard University Press
Release Date :
ISBN : 0674050401
Pages : 376 pages
Rating Book: 4.7/5 (674 users)

Download or read book Corruption in America written by Zephyr Teachout and published by Harvard University Press. This book was released on 2014-09-15 with total page 376 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: When Louis XVI gave Ben Franklin a diamond-encrusted snuffbox, the gift troubled Americans: it threatened to corrupt him by clouding his judgment. By contrast, in 2010 the Supreme Court gave corporations the right to spend unlimited money to influence elections. Zephyr Teachout shows that Citizens United was both bad law and bad history.